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Common Scams You Should Avoid After Losing a Loved One
Jul 25, 2019   10:39 AM
by Karen

When a loved one dies, there is no doubt that it is an overwhelming experience. You have to deal with your emotions while having to make funeral arrangements and taking care of financial matters.

Knowing what a challenging time it is for people who are grieving, there are some who take advantage of what you are going through by trying to scam you. They know that you are in a vulnerable state, and they try to trick you into falling for these scams. Make sure you do not fall victim to these common after-death scams:

  • Medicare scam

Often times, scammers call you or send an email asking for the birth date and Social Security number of the deceased on the pretext that their Medicare insurance information has to be updated. Their real intention is identity theft so make sure that you do not fall for this scam.

  • Fake life insurance policy

You may be contacted by scammers who claim that your loved one was behind on their life insurance policy payments, asking you to complete their payment so that you can be paid out a huge sum of money. Before you transfer the money, make sure you have documents proving that your loved one really did have said insurance.

  • Fake IRS calls

Scammers sometimes pretend to be IRS employees and aggressively nag you on the phone saying that the deceased owes tax money. They may even threaten legal action if you do not pay. The IRS has announced that it never contacts people by phone and asks for money in this manner.

  • Long lost relatives

Finally, there are those scammers who claim to be long, lost relatives. These people come out of the blue after death and claim that they are owed inheritance. Make sure always to confirm their identity first. And, of course, check the Last Will and Testament with a lawyer.

 

Thanks for reading,

Karen

4 Reasons for Publishing Obituaries
Jul 09, 2019   11:15 AM
by Karen

Obituaries have always been an important funeral tradition for years. Initially, newspapers would publish obituaries free of cost as they were considered news stories. However, today, most newspapers charge a fee. Of course, many funeral homes can publish obituaries for free on their website too.

Obituaries may seem like a thing of the past, but there are many benefits to acknowledging the death of a loved one in print. 

  • To honor the memory of the person who has died

Publishing an obituary is a great way to honor the memory of the person who has died. It shows that they are loved and missed and also shares important details about their lives and the kind of person they were. Details like name, date of birth, date of death, survivors, and their accomplishments are usually included in obituaries.

  • To inform others in your community about your loss

When you publish an obituary you are informing other people in your community about your loss in an effective, efficient manner. This way, you save lots of time as you don’t have to call up each one individually. Once informed, they can reach out to you to offer their condolences and prayers.

  • It can help you understand your own loss better

Publishing an obituary can sometimes help you accept your own loss and understand it better. It can be difficult to come to terms that someone you care about has passed away, and seeing the news of their death in a tangible manner can help you come to terms with reality. Besides, writing an obituary brings back fond memories of your loved ones to remember them by.

  • To record history

When you have the news of your loved one’s death in print, it can prove to be very valuable in the years to come so that future generations know about this person and the kind of life they lived.

 

Thanks for reading,

Karen

4 Common Cremation Myths
May 30, 2019   04:46 PM
by Karen

Cremation is a common practice that many people choose over burial to say goodbye to the worldly bodies of their loved ones. However, despite its popularity, it is still shrouded with misconceptions and many people believe myths about it that are far from the truth.

If you or a loved one is considering cremation after death, then you should know that these common myths below are not the truth:

  • The body will have to be lit on fire

Many people tend to believe that in a cremation, the body is directly lit on fire. However, in reality, the body is kept in a specially-designed furnace where flames are used to produce extreme heat. The furnace, also known as a retort, reaches temperatures as high as 1800° F. As a result of this intense heat, the body is reduced to gas and bone fragments, which are then converted to ashes.

  • You can get someone else’s ashes

People often fear that they will be mistakenly given the ashes of another person instead of their loved one. However, in order to prevent this, there are strict laws in place which every crematory authority must follow. So you can be confident that such mix-ups will not happen to you.

  • Cremation means no traditional funeral

A common misconception is that if you have a cremation, you cannot have a traditional funeral. Many people choose to have a funeral or memorial service with the urn present after the cremation process. It all depends on you or the wishes of your loved ones. A body can also be present at a funeral prior to cremation.

  • Scattering ashes is illegal

While some public places do forbid the scattering of ashes, meaning that you cannot scatter ashes anywhere you want, there are plenty of places, both public and private, that allow it. Make sure that you consult the authorities first before doing so.

 

Thanks for reading,

Karen

Why You Should Consider a Memorial Bench to Honor Your Loved One
May 23, 2019   09:25 AM
by Karen

 

Death is a painful truth that we all have to accept one day. A loved one leaving for heavenly abode creates a void in our lives that can never be filled. While there is nothing a grieving family member can do to reunite with their deceased loved one, they can pay tribute to the departed soul by getting a memorial bench placed in a public or private place in their memory.

Available in a range of styles, memorial benches can be placed in parks, gardens or cemeteries. Many people get a memorial bench installed close to their deceased loved one’s burial site. Memorial benches remind people of the deceased person, ensuring that their legacy lives on. Some popular materials used to make memorial benches are wood, metal, stone, and synthetic materials. 

The best way to honor a loved one is by creating a remembrance product that is valued not only by you but also by other community members. A memorial bench can not only help you remember your loved one but can also contribute to the community, providing community members and their visitors a peaceful refuge where they can rest and contemplate life. 

Passersby heaving a sigh of relief after resting on the bench for a while will be the best tribute to the departed soul.

When placing a memorial bench in a public place, make sure to learn and abide by regulations. If you want to bury ashes under the bench, consult local authorities as many cities prohibit people from doing so. When ordering a bench with a plaque, consider the following things:

  • The size and design of the bench
  • Your budget
  • The spot where you want to place the bench.

Make sure the plaque is durable. Many manufacturers supply as many plaques as their clients order. Even if your supplier is unable to deliver multiple plaques, you can opt for additional pieces at a later date.

 

Thanks for reading,

Karen

Glossary of Common Terms Used in Wills and Trusts
Jan 31, 2019   10:08 AM
by Karen

 

It’s normal to feel overwhelmed when dealing with legalese. After all, most of us don’t use these terms in our day to day lives. Lawyers tend to write documents in legalese because it makes it easier for other lawyers to understand what they’re saying.

Have a look at these common terms used in last wills as well as trusts so that you don’t feel quite as lost the next time you have one of these legal documents in front of you.

  1. Testator – The person who makes the will as well as signs her or his name is called the testator. The word testatrix is sometimes used if the person making the will if female.
  2. Beneficiary – Legal documents usually have people who inherit money or other property. The person who inherits these things is known as the beneficiary.
  3. Bequeath – This is another word for 'give'.
  4. Heir – Each state has different laws that state how your property and other assets will be divided in the event of your death. Heirs are the people who will inherit your property and assets from you. Usually a person’s heirs are their spouse and children. If the person didn’t have a spouse or children other relatives are then considered.
  5. Intestate – People who do not leave a will behind specifying what is to be done with their property and other assets are intestates. The state intestacy laws will then be followed to decide who those people's heirs are.
  6. Executor – An executor is a person who executes your will—a person who is in charge of distributing your estate according to your will after you pass. Executrix is sometimes used for a female executor.

There are many other terms used in wills as well as trusts. However, these terms are the most commonly used ones.

 

Thanks for reading,

Karen